Lead Paint Poisoning

Lead is a toxic metal that was used for many years in lead-based products in and around the home. A common source of lead in most homes is lead based paint. Lead poisoning can lead to many serious health problems, including learning disabilities and behavioral problems, high blood pressure, anemia, mental retardation, seizures, paralysis, kidney failure, coma or even death. Children six years of age and younger are the most at risk.

The Center for Disease Control estimates that at least 4 million households have children living in them who are being exposed to high levels of lead. They estimate there are approximately 500,000 children ages 1-5 in the United States with blood lead levels above 5 micrograms per deciliter, the reference level at which they recommend public health actions be initiated.

What should I do if I suspect that my child may have been exposed to lead in my home

If you live in a house or apartment that was built prior to 1978, there is a good chance that your home may contain lead-based paint. If you suspect that your child has been exposed to lead, you should immediately bring your child to a doctor for treatment. The doctor can order a blood test that would determine the amount of lead in your child’s blood. Also, you should contact the local housing authority in your area and tell them that you suspect that there may be lead in your home and ask them to test for lead.

If you rent an apartment, you should immediately notify your landlord of the problem in order to put him or her on notice that your child has been exposed to lead poisoning.

There are certain industries in which workers may be exposed to lead through inhalation of fumes and dusts, as well as though ingestion as a result of lead-contaminated hands, food, drinks and cosmetics. Additionally, workers may accidentally take lead home with them on their clothes, skin, hair, and tools which may put them and their families at risk of lead poisoning. Although the use of lead in the workplace has declined in recent years, it is still often used in the production of batteries, ammunition, and other metal products.

If you would like to obtain additional information on lead poisoning, please view the United States Environmental Protection Agency web site at www.epa.gov/lead/

How do I pursue a claim for lead paint poisoning for my child?

If you feel that your child has been exposed to lead paint in your home and has sustained injuries as a result, you should consult with an attorney that is experienced in handling lead poisoning claims. It is important that you do this as soon as you suspect that your child may have been injured due to lead in the house. After a certain time period you will no longer be able to recover for these injuries. The sooner you contact an attorney about your claim, the better your chances will be of recovering for your child’s injuries.

Attorney Michael P. Foley, Jr., an experienced civil trial attorney, has handled numerous lead paint claims for his clients and their children, including the recovery of $200,000 in a settlement for a three year old girl, and he will be happy to assist you with your case. ($200,000 Settlement for a 3 year old girl who suffered toxic lead poisoning). Please fill out the contact form or call us at 203-250-7212 in order to help you to decide whether or not to pursue a claim for your child's exposure to lead paint.


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